Benefits-Benefits-Benefits

Written by Susan Ratliff on July 9, 2008. Posted in marketing messages

I was just reading a blog post from Vickie Mullins at www.mullinscreative.blogspot   Vickie owns a graphic design company and has a talented team of designers on staff.  I use Vickie’s services and love her creative ideas, attention to detail and reasonable prices.  Anyway, the post talks about crafting great copy and using headlines that give people what they want.  She offers a terrific list of what people want.  It includes many of the benefits people desire and how addressing those customer needs will capture attention and get their business.  This principal applies to exhibit marketing as well.  When conceptualizing your marketing messages on the graphics you will display on your exhibit, consider the needs and desires of your target audience.  Give them what they want to hear.  Don’t dwell on the features of your product or service. How great you think you are, how you do what you do or how many things you do.  People don’t care how you do it as long as you give them results.   Give people what they want.  Check out Vickie’s blog for the compete list, but here are a few ideas:   People want, value,  to look better,  be healthier, prettier,  save money, be safer, make money, gain prestige.  Next time you plan your marketing strategy or sales pitch don’t forget to emphasize What’s in it for them, the customer, first.

Susan   www.susanratliffpresents.com   www.exhibitexpertsaz.com  www.womensbusinessbootcamp.com

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Comments (6)

  • July 18, 2008 at 2:56 pm |

    The objective is always a win win for everyone. Connect with people in a conversational fashion, offer something, ask for something else. Wverybody wins.

  • July 17, 2008 at 7:38 am |

    Susan,
    Yes, I agree with you on your idea that people what to hear what’s in it for me. How will your service or product help me. Most of us have a problem listening. The better the questions we ask the more answers we will here from our clients/customers if we truly stay focused on them and listen.

  • July 13, 2008 at 9:39 pm |

    Andrea and Stanley, thanks for your comments.

    Michelle,your “eating style” quiz is a clever technique to use for engaging prospects in conversation without appearing like a salesperson. It affords you the perfect opportunty to chat with them without pressure,qualify them and uncover their wants and needs. By carefully crafting your quiz questions you could come away with valuable market research, as well.

    Susan

  • July 12, 2008 at 8:42 am |

    Susan:

    You are correct. As Dale Carnegie used to say. You should ALWAYS ask:

    What’s in it for me?

    I know that sounds selfish, but that’s how you get your customers to keep coming back.

    I know I’m preaching to the choir here as this is something you obviously knew LONG ago.

    Stanley Bronstein
    http://stanleybronstein.com
    MrAchievement

  • July 12, 2008 at 8:01 am |

    Susan,

    The other thing about focusing on the benefits that people really want is that it’s so much more fun that way! I don’t want to have to sell myself; I want to serve their needs by showing them how they can live a healthier, happier life. It takes the pressure off of us both!

    Although I speak at conferences far more than I exhibit, one of the tools I’ve used at booths is a fun “Eating Style” quiz (similar but much shorter than the one on my website). The quiz is subtle way of helping them identify the problem. I offer free on-the-spot consultations during which I share a strategy or two to help them with the specific issues they identified. This starts the questions rolling about what else we do that can help them.

    Michelle
    http://www.amihungry.com/

  • July 11, 2008 at 8:51 am |

    Hi Susan. So true, so true. Putting your customer first is at the heart of customer service, I believe. It’s at the heart of servant leadership as well. How can I serve? I love that phrase, and it is often on my mind, and on the minds of those I like to work with. It makes a huge difference. Thanks for the reminder. I also enjoyed Vickie’s list.

    Andrea

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